CANADIAN ASSOCIATION OF TEACHERS OF TECHNICAL WRITING (CATTW/ACPRTS)
CATTW/ACPRTS Annual Conference
Congress of the Social Sciences and Humanities
May 26, 27, 28 2002
University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada


CALL FOR PAPERS


Please submit (e-mail is recommended) 250-word proposals for formal papers to the Program Chair by September 28, 2001, if you intend to apply for travel funding from SSHRC, and, if not, by January 11, 2002. All proposals should be sent to :
cbeaudet@courrier.usherb.ca


CATTW/ACPRTS invites proposals for 20-minute research papers for its 2002 Annual Conference. Two particular areas of interest have been identified as sessions themes: 1. Challenging boundaries: Inter-disciplinary and inter-media approaches to genre and discourse practices; 2. Technical writing and writing-across-the-curriculum: In (a vain?) search of a core expertise. While we hope to receive proposals for papers on these two themes, proposals on other topics related to technical and professional writing are also welcome. All proposals should clearly identify the research on which the paper is based.

SESSION THEMES

1. Challenging boundaries: Inter-disciplinary and inter-media approaches to genre and discourse practices

• Disciplines such as Anthropology, Linguistics, and Literary Theory are currently struggling with key issues in the discussion of genre. What value do these approaches have for researchers and teachers in technical and professional communication?

• Do genres traverse different disciplines or communities of practice? And what happens to text types when they occur in different contexts?

• Is cyberspace a new, qualitatively different realm of discourse practices and genres? Does the www call for new understandings of rhetorical issues such as social context, writer-reader relationships, readability/usability and ethos?

• Are the new discourse communities emerging on the web creating new genres, or reshaping existing genres, in ways that reflect novel values, communication priorities and writing/reading habits? Is it still possible for on-line communities to remain local and culturally unique, and to adapt written genres to their own particular needs? In other words, is the new medium creating a cultural hegemony or allowing for the play of differences?

• If the www creates new contexts for writing, what does this imply for our conceptions of rhetorical expertise and for our teaching practices?

2. Technical writing and writing-across-the-curriculum: In (a vain?) search of a core expertise

• In teaching technical writing or writing-across-the-curriculum, should we be concerned with identifying a common core of knowledge and abilities that our students need to acquire?

• If one admits the existence of a core of expertise, on what disciplines should it be based?

• Are there complications or dangers in trying to identify and teach a core of expertise extending across disciplines or cultures?


ROUNDTABLES, WORKSHOPS AND INFORMAL SESSIONS

We invite proposals to hold roundtables, discussions and informal sessions. We also welcome proposals for informal presentations dealing with the teaching and practice of technical writing; such proposals need not be based on formal research but should foster discussion and exchange of ideas and experiences.

Presenters must be CATTW/ACPRTS members (http://www.uwinnipeg.ca/~goldjo/CATTW).

Please submit (e-mail is recommended) 250-word proposals for formal papers to the Program Chair by September 28, 2001, if you intend to apply for travel funding from SSHRC, and, if not, by January 11, 2002. All proposals should be sent to :
cbeaudet@courrier.usherb.ca

Céline Beaudet, Program Chair,
CATTW/ACPRTS 2002
Département des lettres et communications
Université de Sherbrooke
Sherbrooke (Québec)
Canada J1K 2R1
Telephone : (819) 821-8000, ext. 2264
Fax : (819) 821-7285